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Twincredible survivors can’t wait to start school five years after mum and dad were faced with choice no parent should have to make

Gaia and Luna (Derek Ironside / Newsline)
Gaia and Luna (Derek Ironside / Newsline)

THEY are the tiny twins doctors feared would not survive their birth.

Five years ago their mum and dad were faced with a choice no parent should have to make; take the decision to lose one baby to give the other the possibility of life.

The couple – Amy and Richard Taylor from Aberdeenshire – decided to give them an equal chance.

Back then they would have given the earth to know that their cherished babies would live to start school.

And today the Aberdeenshire couple are over the moon that the little girls are about to take that very step.

Proudly sporting their Meldrum Primary School uniforms, Gaia and Luna – whose names mean earth and moon – couldn’t be happier.

‘They’re our little bravehearts’: Proud parents on a torturous choice before the birth of their twin daughters

Mum Amy, from Oldmeldrum, said today: “The girls are really excited to be starting primary school. They have come so far from when they were tiny babies. We’re excited for them too.”

She and her 46-year-old retail manager husband Richard earlier this year told The Sunday Post of their little fighters’ battle for life after staff at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital discovered a problem with Gaia’s umbilical cord.

Doctors feared both twins might die. The couple decided to let nature take its course and give both babies an equal chance.

They are glad they did.

The proud mum said today: “They’ve been ready for school for a while. I will miss them but I am thrilled too.”

It’s back two school as 500,000-1 twin sisters get ready for class