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The masked zinger: Oor Wullie eases kids’ worries over wearing PPE

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Visiting hospital can be a scary experience for children, and even more so during lockdown when nurses and doctors are dressed in protective equipment.

To help ease their worries, Edinburgh Children’s Hospital Charity has made a film to reassure youngsters about PPE, explaining why “superheroes” of all kinds need to wear masks and other special clothing to stay safe while doing their job.

And to further the charity’s incredible efforts, The Sunday Post has recruited Scotland’s favourite son to help youngsters understand the changes to carers’ uniforms, with Oor Wullie learning about face coverings in today’s comic strip.

Why do you wear your PPE?

For a child, coming in to hospital can be pretty scary at the best of times, but it's especially daunting at the moment with all the doctors and nurses wearing their special PPE for coronavirus.We've called on the help of some of our friends who wear PPE that children are used to seeing to help reassure them and show that these special suits are keeping the doctors and nurses safe while they help people get better.Please LIKE and SHARE to help us spread the message that underneath it all, it's still just us! 👩‍🍳👨‍🔬👩‍🚀👨‍🚒👩‍⚕️❤️#StillJustUs

Posted by Edinburgh Children's Hospital Charity on Saturday, 18 April 2020

“Hospital can be pretty scary for a child at the best of times, but is especially daunting at the moment with all the doctors and nurses wearing their special PPE,” said Roslyn Neely, CEO of Edinburgh Children’s Hospital Charity, one of the partners for the Oor Wullie’s Big Bucket Trail, which raised £1.3 million for children’s charities last year.

“The staff at the Sick Kids let us know that while they’re wearing their PPE, they can’t use all the tricks that they usually use to reassure children and help them feel calm and relaxed.

“So, we called on the help of some of our friends who wear PPE that children are used to seeing to make the video.

“We know from our work in the hospital that using fun and creativity is the best way to take away children’s fears and videos and cartoons are a great way to do that.”

Visit oorwullie.com to download special colouring-in sheets