Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Revealed: Inquiry launched as cost of upgrading Edinburgh to Glasgow rail line soars by £116m

The electrification of the line has gone over budget and overrun, much to the concern of the rail regulator
The electrification of the line has gone over budget and overrun, much to the concern of the rail regulator

A TROUBLED scheme to cut journey times on Scotland’s busiest rail route has soared by more than £110 million.

We can reveal the estimated cost of the plan to cut 10 minutes off the train trip between Edinburgh and Glasgow has climbed from £742m to £858m.

The price hike comes as passengers are already waiting longer for plans to increase the number of seats and increase the frequency of services because of a string of delays to the revamp of Scotland’s busiest rail line.

Rail regulators described the cost increase as “deeply concerning” and revealed they have launched a probe into the delays and budget overruns on the Transport Scotland electrification project.

The Office of Rail and Road said: “The ORR can confirm the latest estimated figure received from Network Rail for Edinburgh Glasgow Improvement Programme (EGIP) is £858 million.

“This increase in cost, aligned with Network Rail’s delay in delivering EGIP is deeply concerning.

“We will publish a lessons learned summary report later this year focusing on the electrification of the Edinburgh to Glasgow line and the underlying causes behind cost increases and programme delays.”

The Rail Thing? Experts scrutinise options for Scotland’s train network and insist passengers must be in the driver’s seat

The Scottish Government have blamed management “weaknesses” by Network Rail for the increase but the track operator insisted it will deliver the scheme as quickly as possible.

Scottish Labour’s transport spokesman Colin Smyth said: “Scotland’s hard pressed passengers are already paying ever increasing fares for trains that are delayed, overcrowded or can’t even be guaranteed to stop at the stations they are supposed to. We have trains running late before they have even been built. Passengers deserve better and Transport Minister Humza Yousaf needs to get a grip.”

The Scottish Government refused to reveal the current price for the EGIP but Network Rail and the ORR – the independent safety and economic regulator for railways – both confirmed the scheme now stands at £858.6m. This is an increase from the last estimate of £742m and up from the budgeted £650m in 2012.

Rail industry insiders say some of the increased costs are down to changes demanded by Transport Scotland but also the cost of making changes where the route’s overhead wires and railway bridges were too low to meet safety standards. Originally scheduled to be complete by last year the EGIP scheme has faced a number of delays with both Network Rail and the ORR consistently raising doubts about the delivery of a 42-minute journey time, with eight-car services, between Edinburgh and Glasgow by December this year.