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Police in fresh abuse probe at leading private school

St Aloysius crest
St Aloysius crest

A fresh police inquiry has been carried out into claims of historical abuse at one of Scotland’s top private schools.

The probe, which follows a similar inquiry three years ago, came after allegations were raised by a former pupil of St Aloysius College, Glasgow, who now lives in Canada. We can also reveal legal action has begun over separate allegations of physical and sexual abuse said to have taken place at the fee-paying school.

Detectives previously interviewed former staff over a historical abuse complaint made in 2017 but, while not ruling out criminality, could not corroborate the claims.

In one case, an ex-pupil has told how he suffered physical and sexual abuse at the hands of lay and Jesuit members of staff in the 1960s.

Another former student states he was physically abused at St Aloysius, also in the 1960s.

A third case outlines details of physical and sexual abuse said to have been suffered by a pupil at the school in the 1970s and ’80s.

One former pupil, now in his 60s, says he suffered sexual abuse over two and a half years by two Jesuit priests at the college. He also said he was subjected to physical abuse by another priest and a lay teacher.

The 2017 police inquiry arose from the claims which are now subject to civil action. The former pupil said: “School was horrendous and ruined my life. I was in my 40s before I sought help and have seen a psychiatrist and clinical psychologist since then.”

Daniel Canning, a lawyer with Thompsons Solicitors, who represents the former pupils, said “dozens of supporting witnesses” had come forward with details of abuse. He said: “We are investigating all allegations of abuse and encourage anyone affected to contact us.”

St Aloysius and the Jesuit order said they were unable to comment.