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Sir Kenny Dalglish: New Everton boss Rafa Benitez will always be accepted by Liverpool fans

© Andy Hooper/Daily Mail/ShutterstockRafa Bentitez won the Champions League with Liverpool in 2005
Rafa Bentitez won the Champions League with Liverpool in 2005

It was going to take something special to take the headlines away from England’s bid to reach the semi-finals of the Euros.

They maybe didn’t quite manage it, of course, but Everton’s decision to appoint Rafa Benitez as their new manager gave it a fair go.

People are entitled to an opinion, and there has been plenty said and written about it.

From the Red side and the Blue side of the city, some can’t believe that a former Liverpool boss has decided to make the switch to Goodison.

My view is that what he achieved as Liverpool manager, such as the Champions League success in 2005, means he will always be an iconic figure at the club.

Rafa will always be appreciated and accepted.

He has a fine CV, and has managed other top clubs such as Inter Milan, Napoli, Chelsea and Newcastle United.

It’s his decision to now accept the challenge at Everton.

It was the third job in the English Premier League to be settled in the past week.

Tottenham appointed Nuno Espirito Santo and Crystal Palace opted for Patrick Vieira after Bruno Lage was given the job at Wolves last month.

So either British coaches have been overlooked, or maybe one or two were offered positions and chose not to accept.

Frank Lampard is one I’d like to see back in the game as quickly as possible.

He started out at Derby County before getting his move to Chelsea, where he was already a legend as a player.

He was sacked by the Blues, but I don’t think that should put anyone off.

Frank has plenty to offer, but maybe he’ll need to bide his time for now.

But it does appear difficult for Brits to break in to English football at the moment, and that is a concern.

However, when you see the likes of David Moyes, Sean Dyche, Dean Smith, Steve Bruce and Graham Potter doing well on a regular basis in England, it’s a reminder of what the British bosses are capable of.