Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Woman released from prison after case championed by celebrities

Cyntoia Brown. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP, Pool, File)
Cyntoia Brown. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP, Pool, File)

A US woman who said she was a 16-year-old sex-trafficking victim when she killed a man in 2004 has been released from prison after being granted clemency.

Kim Kardashian West, Rihanna, Snoop Dogg and Lebron James were among the celebrities who lobbied for Cyntoia Brown’s release, and then-Tennessee governor Bill Haslam agreed in January.

Brown, now 31, will remain on parole supervision for 10 years after her release, on the condition she does not violate any state or federal laws, holds a job, and participates in regular counselling sessions, Mr Haslam’s commutation said.

In a statement, Brown said she wanted to help other women and girls suffering abuse and exploitation.

“I thank Governor and First Lady Haslam for their vote of confidence in me and with the Lord’s help I will make them as well as the rest of my supporters proud,” she wrote.

Her lawyers said she is requesting privacy and transition time before she makes herself available to the public.

Brown was convicted in 2006 of murdering 43-year-old Nashville estate agent Johnny Allen. Police said she shot him in the back of the head at close range with a gun she brought to rob him after he picked her up at a drive-in restaurant in Nashville to have sex with her.

The US Supreme Court has ruled against life-without-parole sentences for juveniles, but the state of Tennessee argued successfully in lower courts that Brown’s sentence was not in violation of federal law because she would be eligible for parole after serving at least 51 years.

Mr Haslam said that was too harsh a condition for a crime Brown admitted to committing as a teenager, especially given the steps she has taken to rebuild her life. She completed studies with Lipscomb University as an inmate.

Brown met prison counsellors to design a plan for her release, which will include time in a transition centre and continuing coursework with the Lipscomb University programme, the state Department of Correction said.

Brown ran away from her adoptive family in Nashville in 2004 and began living in a hotel with a man known as Cut Throat, who forced her to become a prostitute and verbally, physically and sexually assaulted her, according to court documents.

Brown’s lawyers contended she was a victim of sex trafficking who not only feared for her life but also lacked the mental capacity to be culpable in the killing because she was impaired by her mother’s alcohol use while she was in the womb.