Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Moeen Ali admits his ‘gamble’ failed as Pakistan masterclass levels T20 series

England captain Moeen Ali feels his gamble failed in Karachi (Anjum Naveed/AP)
England captain Moeen Ali feels his gamble failed in Karachi (Anjum Naveed/AP)

England captain Moeen Ali insisted a one-over “gamble” on his own off-spin was the deciding moment after a match-winning masterclass from Pakistan duo Babar Azam and Mohammad Rizwan.

The home side chased down a target of 200 in sensational fashion at Karachi’s National Stadium, as Babar’s unbeaten 110 and 88 not out from Rizwan got them over the line without losing a single wicket.

The pair were exemplary as they made a daunting chase look straightforward, but despite bowling just six deliveries in the innings Moeen attempted to take the blame on behalf of his team.

Pakistan captain Babar Azam plays a shot during the second T20
Pakistan captain Babar Azam plays a shot during the second T20 (Anjum Naveed/AP)

He brought himself on for the 13th over and leaked 21 runs, including three sixes, as Pakistan moved themselves into a dominant position.

“The momentum changed when I bowled my over. That really gave them the belief and after that they were almost unstoppable,” he said after the home side made it 1-1 after two games.

“I felt like it was under control for most of it. I genuinely feel my over lost the game for us. That was a gamble on my part.

“I went to try and get a wicket, almost buy a wicket. Obviously it didn’t work and that’s when Pakistan really won the game.”

By the time Moeen came on Alex Hales had already dropped Rizwan on 23 off Liam Dawson, another moment that proved crucial to the outcome.

“We dropped a big catch obviously. You can’t afford to drop them and you can’t afford to bowl an off-spinner to them at such a big time,” he added.

Moeen paid tribute to Pakistan’s batting heroes, who both started the series in the top three of the world rankings, and hit back at some of the criticism they have been subject too from their own fans.

They were lambasted by local pundits for not scoring quickly enough at the recent Asia Cup, but could hardly have envisaged a more perfect response.

“They played really, really well tonight. I know they get a lot of stick for their strike-rates but I believe their strike-rates are very good anyway and they are brilliant players.

“Sometimes media outlets pressure players even when they’re doing well. They were brilliant and today it was their day.”

England do not have long to lick their wounds, with back-to-back fixtures meaning the third of the seven games takes place on Friday night, with changes likely among the bowling attack.