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Matthew Hudson-Smith takes third place in Eugene to set new British record

Matthew Hudson-Smith broke the 25-year-old British record in the 400m (Martin Rickett/PA)
Matthew Hudson-Smith broke the 25-year-old British record in the 400m (Martin Rickett/PA)

Matthew Hudson-Smith set a new British record when finishing third in the men’s 400 metres at the Diamond League meeting in Eugene.

Hudson-Smith, 27, from Wolverhampton, broke Iwan Thomas’ previous mark, which had stood for 25 years, by one 100th of a second as he clocked 44.35 seconds.

He finished behind American winner Michael Norman, who ran the world’s quickest time this year and set a new meeting record of 43.60 seconds, and Grenada’s Kirani James, who set a season’s personal best in 44.02.

Hudson-Smith said: “I just got out. I’d got a plan, to attack and take it like a semi-final of the World Championships and see what’s to work on for the championships.

“It’s still a lot to do, but I’m really happy with a personal-best national record, so I can’t complain.”

The European champion, who eclipsed his previous best of 44.48, added: “Honestly, a lot has changed. Mental. My mental state. A load of work in the gym.

“I’ve worked on the mechanics and diet, everything. We’ve changed the whole lifestyle, flipped it around and it’s paying dividends.”

Thomas set his previous British record of 44.36 in Birmingham in 1997.

Keely Hodgkinson followed up her recent win in Birmingham with another victory in the 800 metres ahead of American pair Ajee Wilson and Raevyn Rogers.

Hodgkinson, silver medallist at the Tokyo Olympics last summer, set the world’s quickest time this year of 1:57.72. Jemma Reekie finished eighth in a season’s best 2:00.53.

Dina Asher-Smith ran under 11 seconds in the 100m, but finished well behind Jamaica’s Olympic champion Elaine Herah-Thompson in fourth place.

Asher-Smith, who won in Birmingham last week, clocked a season’s best 10.98 behind Herah-Thompson (10.79), American Sha’Carri Richardson and Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson (both 10.92).

Laura Muir finished in a disappointing 11th place in the women’s 1500m in a time of 4:04.45, behind Kenyan winner and Olympic champion Faith Kipyegon.