Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Ralph Hasenhuttl not interested in making big-money signings for Southampton

Ralph Hasenhuttl believes Southampton will steer clear of major outlays on individual players (Gareth Fuller/PA)
Ralph Hasenhuttl believes Southampton will steer clear of major outlays on individual players (Gareth Fuller/PA)

Ralph Hasenhuttl has insisted big-money signings “make no sense” for Southampton.

Saints have already brought in six recruits ahead of the new campaign, with further additions still being sought.

Manager Hasenhuttl believes spending upwards of £40million on one player remains off Southampton’s agenda however, with the south coast club continuing to focus on young, upwardly mobile targets.

“I’m still of the opinion that £40 or £50million transfers make no sense for us,” said Hasenhuttl.

“But we of course want quality, and if it’s young, OK, no problem, take it.

“This is the way we want to go and it’s good that we have done our job so far.

“But the transfer window is open so long that, if we do something we have enough time to do it.”

Rangers’ Joe Aribo, young Bordeaux forward Sekou Mara and 18-year-old Manchester City midfielder Romeo Lavia are all among Saints’ new recruits.

Ireland goalkeeper Gavin Bazunu has also made the move from City and could have a big role to play despite his relative young age of 20 for a stopper.

The transfer window will remain open until September 1, with Hasenhuttl expecting the opening Premier League exchanges to add yet more twists to top-flight recruitment plans.

Saints will start their campaign at Tottenham on Saturday, and the south coast club’s Austrian boss admitted he has been happy with the players already recruited.

“I’m not so sure on the effect on prices of the window staying open, some other clubs will also look at first games, how strong they are, or if they have weaknesses,” said Hasenhuttl.

“So I’m not sure if prices of players will go up or down again even after matches. Then the market is sometimes a bit stupid and strange.

“But for us it was a good thing we could do this season some things that we normally could only do after selling a few players.

“This was different this season definitely, and helped you to get some players in that you wish you can get, and what also makes sense for us I think.”