Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Johnson pledges allegiance to King as Commons returns following Queen’s funeral

Former prime minister Boris Johnson pledges allegiance to the King (House of Commons/PA)
Former prime minister Boris Johnson pledges allegiance to the King (House of Commons/PA)

Boris Johnson was among the latest group of MPs to pledge allegiance to the King as the House of Commons met for the first time since the Queen’s funeral.

The Conservative former prime minister was the 15th MP on Wednesday to take an oath of allegiance to Charles.

Mr Johnson spent time in the queue chatting with DUP MP Sammy Wilson (East Antrim) and Transport Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan.

Holding the King James Bible, Mr Johnson said: “I swear by almighty God that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to His Majesty King Charles, his heirs and successors, according to law, so help me God.”

Ms Trevelyan was the first MP to swear in on Wednesday followed by Home Secretary Suella Braverman.

MPs are sworn in after each general election so they can take their seat, speak in debates, vote and receive a salary.

The wording of the oath means MPs have already pledged their allegiance to the heirs and successors of the Queen, meaning they do not have to do it again at this point.

A total of 31 MPs pledged their allegiance to Charles during the first swearing-in session on September 10.

Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle opened proceedings by thanking parliamentary staff, members of the armed forces and others for their efforts during the Queen’s lying-in-state and funeral.

He told MPs: “I also want to put on record my gratitude to all those who helped ensure events of the last 10 days or so have been managed with such dignity and brilliance, albeit in the saddest of circumstances.

“That includes, of course, many outside this House, including our armed services, the police and countless others.

“I want to say a very special thank you especially to all those parliamentary staff, including colleagues who volunteered to take on roles beyond their day jobs who contributed and you ensured that Parliament was able to play its part safely, respectfully and with pride, and so I am extremely grateful for all that has been done.”

UK Parliament of Speaker Sir Lindsey Hoyle joins selected MPs to take the oath and swear allegiance to the Crown (UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/PA)
UK Parliament of Speaker Sir Lindsey Hoyle joins selected MPs to take the oath and swear allegiance to the Crown (UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/PA)

Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng chose to swear the oath, as did Labour deputy leader Angela Rayner.

Welsh Secretary Sir Robert Buckland opted to swear the oath in English on the King James Bible and then a second time in Welsh holding a Welsh language Bible, while Labour’s Nia Griffith, MP for Llanelli, opted to affirm in both English and Welsh.

Conservative MP for Harrow East Bob Blackman took his oath holding both the Bible and the Bhagavad Gita Hebrew text.

He was followed by Labour MP for Bradford West Naz Shah, who took her oath holding the Koran while covering her head with a scarf.

BEIS minister Nusrat Ghani and Labour’s Yasmin Qureshi, MP for Bolton South East, both also took their oaths on the Koran.

Veteran Conservative Sir Edward Leigh, MP for Gainsborough, was among several MPs who opted to swear the oath on the Catholic Bible, while Conservative Scott Mann MP for North Cornwall also chose to swear the oath in Cornish.

The final MP of the day to swear the oath was security minister Tom Tugendhat, who arrived in the Chamber just after 6pm.

As the hour approached, Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay could be heard reading out a message from Mr Tugendhat claiming he was on the way, after a period of silence where no other MPs had appeared for some time.

MPs were able to swear the oath or affirm throughout Wednesday, with Sir Lindsay advising at the start of the day: “I remind members that swearing-in is recorded by the television cameras, anything said or done by members may appear on television or may be picked up on the microphones.”

Normal business in the Commons will resume on Thursday.