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Housing market ‘defied any expectations of a slowdown in June’

The housing market defied any expectations of a slowdown in June, with average property prices up 1.8% month-on-month, according to Halifax (David Cheskin/PA)
The housing market defied any expectations of a slowdown in June, with average property prices up 1.8% month-on-month, according to Halifax (David Cheskin/PA)

The housing market defied any expectations of a slowdown in June, with average property prices up 1.8% month-on-month, marking the biggest monthly rise since early 2007, according to an index.

House prices were up by 13.0% annually, marking the highest growth rate on this measure since late 2004, Halifax said.

Across the UK, the average house price in June was a record £294,845.

In Scotland, the average house price passed the £200,000 mark for the first time.

Northern Ireland had the strongest annual house price growth at 15.2%, and within England, the South West was the strongest region for annual house price growth, at 14.2%.

Wales also continued to record a strong rate of annual growth, with house prices increasing by 14.3%.

A slowing of house price growth should still be expected in the months ahead, Halifax said.

Russell Galley, managing director, Halifax, said: “The UK housing market defied any expectations of a slowdown, with average property prices up 1.8% in June, the biggest monthly rise since early 2007.

“This means house prices have now risen every month over the last year, and are up by 6.8% or £18,849 in cash terms so far in 2022, pushing the typical UK house price to another record high of £294,845.

“The supply-demand imbalance continues to be the reason house prices are rising so sharply.

“Demand is still strong – though activity levels have slowed to be in line with pre-Covid averages – while the stock of available properties for sale remains extremely low.

“Property prices so far appear to have been largely insulated from the cost-of-living squeeze.

“This is partly because, right now, the rise in the cost of living is being felt most by people on lower incomes, who are typically less active in buying and selling houses.

“In contrast, higher earners are likely to be able to use extra funds saved during the pandemic, with latest industry data showing that mortgage lending has increased by the highest amount since last September.

“Of course, the housing market will not remain immune from the challenging economic environment.

“But for now it continues to demonstrate – as it has done over the last couple of years – the unique combination of factors impacting prices.

“One of these remains the huge shift in demand towards bigger properties, with average prices for detached houses rising by almost twice the rate of flats over the past year (13.9% versus 7.6%).

“In time though, increased pressure on household budgets from inflation and higher interest rates should weigh more heavily on the housing market, given the impact this has on affordability.”

He added: “So while it may come later than previously anticipated, a slowing of house price growth should still be expected in the months ahead.”

Here are average house prices in June and the annual increase, according to Halifax:

East Midlands, £241,875, 12.6%

Eastern England, £341,544, 12.4%

London, £547,031, 7.1%

North East, £169,760, 11.0%

North West, £224,941, 12.0%

Northern Ireland, £187,833, 15.2%

Scotland, £201,549, 9.9%

South East, £396,173, 11.9%

South West, £308,128, 14.2%

Wales, £219,281, 14.3%

West Midlands, £247,130, 11.5%

Yorkshire and the Humber, £203,630, 10.3%