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Almost one fifth of workers set to leave their jobs in next 12 months

Almost a fifth of workers said they expect to leave their current job in the next year (Joe Giddens/PA)
Almost a fifth of workers said they expect to leave their current job in the next year (Joe Giddens/PA)

Almost a fifth of UK workers have said they expect to leave their current job for a new employer in the next 12 months as the seek better pay and job satisfaction, according to new research.

A survey by accounting giant PwC has found that 18% of workers said they “are very or extremely likely” to switch jobs in a year.

Meanwhile, a further 32% said they are moderately or slightly likely to change jobs, in the study of 52,195 workers across 44 countries.

The global study, which includes more than 2,000 respondents in the UK, found 27% of UK workers are planning to ask their employer for more money in the next 12 months.

The Office for National Statistics revealed earlier this month that regular average pay grew by 4.2% over the first three months of 2022 but has been outstripped by soaring wider inflation.

Last week, the Governor of the Bank of England, Andrew Bailey, said that workers, particularly high earners, should “think and reflect” before asking for wage increases in order to avoid fuelling wider inflation further.

Kevin Ellis, chairman and senior partner at PwC UK, said: “The economic outlook may be uncertain but it would be premature to call the end of the Great Resignation.

“Highly skilled workers are in hot demand and employers can’t be complacent.

“It’s not just about keeping the most talented workers happy – our data highlights the need and opportunity to create new talent and ensure no one gets left behind.

“Employees will vote with their feet if their expectations on company culture, reward, flexibility and learning are not being largely met.”

Around two-thirds of UK people surveyed said they are working remotely full-time or most of the time.

Hybrid working came out on top as the preferred future way of work with 62% of respondents opting for a mix of in-office and remote working.

It comes after MPs have criticised the civil service and other workers continuing with some remote working following the pandemic.