Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

When it comes to awards season, Celtic have too many good players

When it comes to awards season, Celtic have too many good players

Like Neil Lennon, I’m staggered not one Celtic player made the shortlist for PFA Scotland’s Player of the Year.

But history shows, in a democratic voting system, these things happen. Having been involved in the Scottish Football Writers’ Player of the Year, both as President and a committee member, I know only too well how a split vote can prevent the winner coming from the leading club of that season. You can have too many good players for your own good.

Brian McClair (below) won both the players’ and journalists’ awards in 1987 despite Celtic winning nothing. Rangers lifted the title and League Cup, St Mirren won the Scottish Cup and Dundee United reached both UEFA and Scottish Cup Finals.

Yet the Celtic striker won both individual accolades, as the vote was spread amongst the likes of Terry Butcher, Ally McCoist and Dave Narey.

There are other examples.

While Celtic were in the midst of their nine-in-a-row under Jock Stein, and just a year after they’d lifted the European Cup, Gordon Wallace of Raith Rovers won the Football Writers’ award.

His 27 goals in 34 games kept the Kirkcaldy club in the top flight in 1968. I’ve known these awards won by landslide margins and witnessed dead heats. Eight years ago, Celtic striker John Hartson and Rangers defender Fernando Ricksen actually shared the players’ own award after the vote had been evenly split.

The voting process for this season’s Football Writers’ Award has just started, and I envisage my fellow members being confronted with the same problem as the players.

Celtic, easily the outstanding team, have numerous worthy winners for these individual accolades.

However, with no matches against Rangers this season there has been no Old Firm drama to tip the balance the way of one particular individual.

That’s just another negative for Celtic while the Light Blues remain away from the top table.

Not that the Glasgow giants’ rivalry prevented non-Old Firm players from winning these awards in the past. Apart from Wallace, Pat Stanton, Martin Buchan, Andy Ritchie, Gordon Strachan, Alan Rough, Paul Sturrock, Willie Miller, Hamish McAlpine, Alex McLeish, Sandy Jardine (as a Hearts player) and Maurice Malpas are previous recipients of the SFWA trophy.

Paul Hegarty, Mark McGhee, Sandy Clark, Willie Miller, Jim Duffy, Richard Gough, Theo Snelders and Jim Bett have been honoured by their fellow players.

Who am I voting for this season? Kris Commons.