Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Hong Kong journalist granted bail and allowed to leave for overseas fellowship

Senior editor of Stand News, Ronson Chan, centre, is arrested by police officers in Hong Kong (AP)
Senior editor of Stand News, Ronson Chan, centre, is arrested by police officers in Hong Kong (AP)

The head of Hong Kong’s largest journalist group has been granted bail and allowed to leave the city for an overseas fellowship two weeks after being arrested for allegedly obstructing police officers while reporting.

Ronson Chan, who chairs the Hong Kong Journalists Association, pleaded not guilty to two counts of obstructing the police.

A conviction could mean up to two years in jail.

Chan was allowed to post bail and leave Hong Kong for a fellowship programme at the University of Oxford later this month on the condition that he keeps the Hong Kong police updated on his address and mobile number while in Britain.

He was arrested while reporting on a homeowners’ meeting in the Mong Kok district earlier this month with a colleague.

Ronson Chan speaks outside his office after being released from a police station in Hong Kong on December 29 2021
Ronson Chan speaks outside his office after being released from a police station in Hong Kong on December 29 2021 (Vincent Yu/AP)

Police said the two were behaving in a suspicious manner and were asked to produce proof of identity.

Chan was arrested after he was allegedly unco-operative and refused to show his identity card.

His arrest prompted concern from the city’s Foreign Correspondents’ Club, which said it “supports journalists’ right to cover stories without fear of harassment and arrest”.

The club also called on authorities to exercise “transparency and care” in handling the case.

When asked on Thursday outside the court about his thoughts on press freedom in Hong Kong, Chan said he was not able to discuss details of the case, but said that “everyone in Hong Kong, if you try to observe what is happening, then you can get the answer”.

Hong Kong, once a bastion of press freedom in Asia, has since seen its press freedoms decline after a tough national security law aimed at stamping out dissent was imposed on the city.

Media outlets critical of the government, such as the now-defunct Apple Daily and Stand News, shut down after police raided their offices and arrested executives and journalists.