Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Wimbledon first-day attendance low after officials predicted ‘record crowd’

Attendance on the first day of Wimbledon was markedly low despite people queueing at the gate overnight and organisers saying they expected a ‘record crowd’ (John Walton/PA)
Attendance on the first day of Wimbledon was markedly low despite people queueing at the gate overnight and organisers saying they expected a ‘record crowd’ (John Walton/PA)

Attendance on the first day of Wimbledon was markedly low despite people queueing at the gate overnight and organisers saying they expected a “record crowd”.

Just over 36,600 people poured in to the All England Club in SW19 to watch sports stars including Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic and Emma Raducanu as the tournament returned at full capacity for the first time in three years.

Organisers had expected 42,000 spectators daily – the maximum capacity – but many seats were left empty on Monday, even in Centre Court.

It came as thousands of people queued overnight for on-the-day premium tickets.

Several fans who had been camping outside said they felt attendance was lower, even in the queue, because of the absence of fan favourite Roger Federer this year.

Fears about Covid-19, which has already taken two players out of the running, and rainy weather may also have been putting some people off.

Wimbledon 2022 – Day Two – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club
Spectators with umbrellas on day two of Wimbledon 2022 (John Walton/PA)

Colm O’Donnell, from Ashford in Kent, said: “This is my fifth year, and 2017, 2018, 2019, I’ve seen Roger Federer.

“This is the first year that I’m feeling neutral, not seeing my favourite player that I really would pay good money to see and watch on court.”

Mr O’Donnell said he might have opted to enter through the ballot, as he has in previous years, if Federer had been playing.

The tournament has already been hit by coronavirus, taking out last year’s runner-up and one of the favourites for Wimbledon, Italy’s Matteo Berrettini, who tested positive on Tuesday.

His withdrawal follows that of Croatian former finalist Marin Cilic, who announced on Monday that he had also tested positive for Covid-19.

All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) officials suggested that empty seats seen later in the day were due to people leaving early.

A spokesperson said: “Yesterday we were delighted to welcome back two long-held Wimbledon traditions after a three-year hiatus – the Queue and the Ticket Resale Scheme.

“Day one saw a natural bedding in of operations for these ticketing opportunities, and we will be encouraging any Centre, No 1 and No 2 Court ticketholders to scan out their tickets on departure so they can be offered back through the Ticket Resale Scheme and ensure that these courts are fully populated for late play.”

On Monday, officials had said that having the prestigious grass courts competition running for the full 14 days for the first time means that thousands more spectators are expected to be involved in the action.

In previous years, players have taken a break on the middle Sunday to allow the courts to recover, but, thanks to improved technology, this is no longer necessary, the chief executive of the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) said.

Speaking ahead of the first matches, Sally Bolton told reporters: “(This is the) first year of permanent middle Sunday, so we are expecting a record crowd because of that.”

2022 Wimbledon Preview – Saturday June 25th – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club
Serena Williams during a practice session at Wimbledon (John Walton/PA)

Day two heralds Serena Williams’ first match in the tournament against France’s Harmony Tan, who at 24 is 16 years her junior.

The US athlete will be hoping to reach a record-equalling 24th grand slam singles title.

Meanwhile, American Coco Gauff, 18, will be facing Romanian Elena-Gabriela Ruse, as she stands on the verge of a top-10 breakthrough, having reached her first grand slam final at the French Open earlier this month.

Men’s number two Rafael Nadal, from Spain, is vying to win his third successive grand slam title and 23rd overall despite suffering a severe foot injury after the French Open less than a month ago.

Ten British players will also be taking to the hallowed south-west London courts.

Both men’s and women’s British number ones impressive victories on day one, with Cameron Norrie securing a rain-interrupted triumph before Emma Raducanu won her Centre Court debut match.

Women’s singles players Harriet Dart, Katie Boulter, Katie Swan and Sonay Kartal will be hoping to replicate this success on day two.

Meanwhile, Birmingham-born British number two Dan Evans will be joined by Jack Draper, Liam Broady, Ryan Peniston, Paul Jubb and Alastair Gray in the men’s morning matches.

It comes after the first day saw team GB’s Jodie Burrage revive a fainting ball boy with Percy Pig sweets, while play was paused on other courts due to rain showers.

After the washout start to Wimbledon, sunshine is scheduled for Tuesday.

The Met Office has forecast “rather breezy” weather for south-west London, with patchy sunshine and maximum temperatures of 23C (73.4F).