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What the papers say – December 5

What the papers say (Peter Byrne/PA)
What the papers say (Peter Byrne/PA)

The Government’s plans to crackdown on migration dominates the front pages of Tuesday’s newspapers.

The Daily Telegraph says the plan outlined by Home Secretary James Cleverly will “cut arrivals by a quarter” and are designed to prevent a revolt by right-wing Conservative MPs following the publication of record migration figures.

The “five-point” plan is outlined on the front of The Times, which says tougher rules on work visas and bringing in relatives would halve net arrivals.

The Financial Times also concentrates on tougher wage and visa rules while the Daily Express says the proposals will “slash migration by 300,000”, which is echoed in the Daily Mail.

Those views are echoed in The Sun, which concentrates on an article from Prime Minister Rishi Sunak with the front page headline “Access Denied”.

The Prime Minister is also the focus of the Metro, which says he has begun a “new crackdown on migration” while The Independent calls the move a “desperate bid to win over right-wing Tories” amid plummeting approval ratings, asking “Just how much lower can you sink, Mr Sunak?”.

Other stories do make the front pages, the i saying the “toothless” Environment Agency visited only 10% of water pollution incidents last year.

The Guardian focuses on an investigation into Sellafield, saying the nuclear site has been hacked into by “cyber groups closely linked to Russia and China”.

Nigel Farage makes the front of the Daily Mirror which says he has been dubbed “too dull” and has “no personality” on I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!

And the Daily Star turns its focus on 20,000 asteroids which have the potential to destroy the Earth.