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What the papers say – April 13

What the papers say (PA)
What the papers say (PA)

Wednesday’s papers are dominated by the partygate scandal as the Prime Minister and Chancellor pay fines and apologise for attending Boris Johnson’s birthday bash in Downing Street during Covid restrictions.

“People have the right to expect better” reads The Daily Telegraph‘s front page splash, citing Mr Johnson’s apology as he became the first serving PM to break the law.

The Financial Times reports pressure is mounting for Mr Johnson to quit for committing the criminal offence while in office.

The Times, i and The Guardian all lead with the PM’s refusal to resign over the lockdown offence.

“PM: I’m sorry, I will do better for Britain,” leads the Daily Express, focusing on the apology itself.

The Sun similarly splashes with Mr Johnson’s apology, with its headline reading: “I’m sorry but I have work to do” – in reference to the war in Ukraine and cost-of-living crisis.

“PM and the Chancellor broke law”, Metro says of the scandal.

The Independent features the front door of No10 on its front page, accompanied by the words: “Scene of the crime”.

The Daily Mail appears to come to the defence of the Prime Minister as “the Left howls for resignations”, with the paper’s front page reading: “Don’t they know there’s a war on?”.

The Daily Mirror takes a less sympathetic stance, running an image of Mr Johnson and Mr Sunak on the front page with the headline: “Led by liars & lawbreakers.”

And the Daily Star carries the same image, albeit after undergoing the photoshop treatment, with the headline: “The Pinocchio Prime Minister.”