Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Preventable cancer cases on the rise, charity says

Smoking is a big risk factor in cancer cases (Sean Dempsey/PA)
Smoking is a big risk factor in cancer cases (Sean Dempsey/PA)

Drinking, tanning and smoking are contributing to around 400 “preventable” cases of cancer every day in the UK, new estimates have suggested.

The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has estimated that about 155,000 cases of cancer could be prevented every year if people led different lifestyles.

It said that some 387,820 people were diagnosed with cancer in 2019/20, the latest figures available.

However, people leading unhealthy lifestyles mean this figure is higher than it should be.

The charity said that, compared with 2017 data, there was an increase of 8,000 “preventable cases”.

It said that about 40% of cancers could be prevented through lifestyle changes such as eating healthily, being active, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking.

People can also stop drinking alcohol, cut back their red meat consumption and avoid processed meat to help reduce their risk of cancer.

They can also stay safe in the sun and breastfeed where possible, the charity added.

“Over the years, research has estimated that around 40% of cancers are associated with modifiable risk factors,” said Dr Vanessa Gordon-Dseagu, research interpretation manager at WCRF.

“These risk factors include smoking and limiting sun exposure.

“Alongside this, research has shown that, by following WCRF’s cancer prevention recommendations, individuals can reduce their cancer risk.

“It is also important to remember that our population is ageing, so we are likely to see incidence of cancer continue to increase over the next few decades.

“Screening plays a vital role in improving cancer outcomes – the earlier someone is diagnosed, the more likely they are to survive.”

It comes after Cancer Research UK said that “ending smoking” would slash the number of cancer cases which are linked to deprivation.

A study published last week in the journal PLOS One found that if nobody in England smoked then cancer cases linked to deprivation would reduce from 27,200 to 16,500.