Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Court of Appeal due to rule on legal issues arising out of ‘Colston Four’ case

(PA)
(PA)

A ruling on legal issues arising out of the acquittal of four people who were prosecuted for pulling down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston during a Black Lives Matter protest – the so-called Colston Four – will be delivered by judges.

Court of Appeal judges were told at a hearing in June that the toppling of the statue was an “unacceptable way to engage in political debate”.

The bronze memorial to the 17th-century slave merchant was pulled down during a Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol on June 7 2020, before being rolled into the water.

In January this year, four protesters involved in tearing down the statue were cleared by a jury at Bristol Crown Court of criminal damage.

Black Lives Matter protests
Sage Willoughby, Jake Skuse, Milo Ponsford and Rhian Graham outside Bristol Crown Court (Ben Birchall/PA)

All four had admitted involvement but denied their actions were criminal, claiming the statue itself had been a hate crime against the people of Bristol.

Following the jury’s decision, then-attorney general Suella Braverman referred the case to the Court of Appeal so judges could “clarify the law for future cases” – without affecting the four’s acquittals.

At a hearing in London in June, three judges considered the law around the acquittal of Rhian Graham, one of the four.

Lawyers representing the Attorney General’s Office argued at the hearing that pulling down the statue was “a violent act” involving “significant force”.

They said violent acts are not covered by the European Convention on Human Rights’ freedoms of conscience under article 9, expression under article 10 and association under article 11.

Lawyers for Ms Graham said the referral to the Court of Appeal should not have been made, arguing that part of the Attorney General’s case was “no more than a general attack on the use of juries”.

The court was told that Colston played an active role in the enslavement of 84,000 black people, with around 19,000 people dying on slave ships from Africa.

“The statue caused serious distress, offence and harm to Bristolians and others, including black people,” Ms Montgomery said in written submissions.

Human rights organisation Liberty also made representations to the court.

The Lord Chief Justice Lord Burnett, Mr Justice Holgate and Mr Justice Saini are due to give their decision in writing at 12 noon on Wednesday.