Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Cambridge University’s youngest college is granted listed status

Cambridge’s Robinson College, which has been listed at Grade II* (Historic England/PA)
Cambridge’s Robinson College, which has been listed at Grade II* (Historic England/PA)

Cambridge University’s youngest college has been granted Grade II* listed status and hailed as a “stunning city landmark”.

Robinson College, which was built between 1977 and 1980, was Cambridge’s first purpose-built co-educational college and the last college to be established at Cambridge University.

It has been listed at Grade II* by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) on the advice of Historic England.

Sir Richard Heaton, warden of Robinson College, said: “This news is a significant milestone for Robinson College and for Cambridge University.

“Since Queen Elizabeth II opened the College in 1981, some 5,000 students have lived and studied here.

“They have enjoyed a modern, open and welcoming building, set in beautiful gardens that have grown and matured with the College.

The hall at Cambridge's Robinson College, which has been listed at Grade II*. (Layton Thomas/ Historic England/ PA)
The hall at Cambridge’s Robinson College which has been listed at Grade II* (Historic England/PA)

“We are immensely proud that the listing recognises the particular contribution that our red-brick College makes to Cambridge’s architectural and cultural heritage.

“I am especially pleased that the report draws attention to the superb architectural quality of our chapel and our library.

“Robinson has earned its status as an exceptional and distinctive College in the Cambridge tradition.

“The Listing of our building is a celebration of that.”

Matthew Cooper, Historic England senior listing advisor, said: “These beautifully designed buildings are an important example of post-war college design and a striking addition to eight centuries of college construction within the University of Cambridge.

“The artistic interiors of the chapel and the library are particularly remarkable.

The chapel window at Cambridge's Robinson College, which has been listed at Grade II*. (SpotyPhoto/ Historic England/ PA)
The chapel window at Cambridge’s Robinson College which has been listed at Grade II* (Historic England/PA)

“The College, with its distinctive red brick exteriors, is a stunning city landmark.”

Funding for the new college had been given by David Robinson (1904-1987), who made his wealth renting televisions and radios under the name Robinson Rentals, and from his major contribution to British horse racing.

He funded many philanthropic schemes, including the unprecedented donation of £18 million to fund the creation of Robinson College.

Ten architectural practices were invited to compete in a limited competition for the design of the college.

The winners were the Glasgow-based architectural practice of Gillespie, Kidd & Coia (GK&C).

They were the only practice whose scheme proposed to preserve most of the Edwardian gardens in the college’s chosen location on Grange Road in Cambridge.

The new college buildings – covered with approximately 1.4 million handmade bricks – were concentrated in megastructures that followed the boundary of the site, to incorporate the existing gardens.

The principal entrance to the college is through the ramped gatehouse that houses the porters’ lodge.

A number of courts lie between inhabited walls of raked accommodation and connect to the principal communal spaces, including the fine library, chapel and auditoria.

Some services which still survive, which would have been unusual as purpose-built facilities in a Cambridge college, include a music suite with dedicated record library and hi-fi room, and a photographers’ dark room.