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Anne meets members of armed forces to offer thanks for roles in Queen’s funeral

The Princess Royal, as Commodore-in-Chief Portsmouth, meets Royal Navy personnel at Portsmouth Naval Base who took part in the Queen’s funeral procession (Andrew Matthews/PA)
The Princess Royal, as Commodore-in-Chief Portsmouth, meets Royal Navy personnel at Portsmouth Naval Base who took part in the Queen’s funeral procession (Andrew Matthews/PA)

The Princess Royal has met members of the armed forces to offer her personal thanks for their roles in the Queen’s funeral.

Anne visited Portsmouth Naval Base and St Omer Barracks in Aldershot to meet representatives of the Royal Navy and Army personnel who had been involved in the procession and planning.

More than 1,000 sailors and Royal Marines were on duty at the funeral on Monday, alongside RAF and British Army personnel.

Anne visited Portsmouth in her role as Commodore-in-Chief Portsmouth, while at Aldershot she attended in her position as Colonel-in-Chief of both the Royal Logistic Corps and the Royal Corps of Signals.

The Princess Royal, in her role as Colonel-in-Chief of both the Royal Logistic Corps, and Royal Corps of Signals, meets personnel from across the Corps at St Omer Barracks, Aldershot, who played a central role providing logistical support during the Queen’s funeral and other ceremonial duties
The Princess Royal, in her role as Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Logistic Corps and Royal Corps of Signals, meets personnel from across the Corps at St Omer Barracks (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Leading Engineering Technician (LET) Benjamin Tetley was one of 142 sailors responsible for pulling the gun carriage.

He said: “It was an honour to meet Her Royal Highness Princess Anne.

“It was a lovely personal touch that she came down in person to thank personnel involved.

“I was really honoured to be involved in carrying the gun carriage, I don’t think there’s a more personal part to have played.

The Princess Royal, right, as Commodore-in-Chief Portsmouth, meets Royal Navy personnel at Portsmouth Naval Base who took part in the Queen’s funeral procession
Anne meets Royal Navy personnel at Portsmouth Naval Base who took part in the Queen’s funeral procession (Andrew Matthews/PA)

“Everyone had a sense of purpose and put all their effort in.

“The Royal Navy is steeped in tradition and we helped upkeep that. To be part of that history and tradition is truly an honour.”

LET Tim Lavender, based at HMS Sultan in nearby Gosport, managed a team of nine sailors working on the gun crew movement and management.

He said: “I felt very honoured. If you put the Royal Navy and us sailors under pressure, we come together and we get the job done.”

The Princess Royal, in her role as Colonel-in-Chief of both the Royal Logistic Corps, and Royal Corps of Signals, meets personnel from across the Corps at St Omer Barracks, Aldershot, who played a central role providing logistical support during the Queen’s funeral and other ceremonial duties
The Princess Royal at St Omer Barracks (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Aircraft Engineer Connor Scotney, who was a street liner in Windsor, said: “I felt honoured that the Princess Royal took the time out to thank us for all we did.

“My family are all very proud of me and the part I played in the funeral.”