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School pupils urged to share views on education reform in Scotland

School pupils are being encouraged to share their views on education in Scotland (David Jones/PA)
School pupils are being encouraged to share their views on education in Scotland (David Jones/PA)

School pupils in Scotland have been urged to share their views on the future of education to help establish new qualifications and assessment bodies.

A national discussion called Let’s Talk Scottish Education has been launched for those aged three to 18 to share their experiences.

Education secretary Shirley-Anne Somerville said the views of young people will help shape a reform programme of qualifications and assessment.

The Scottish Government has also committed to replacing Education Scotland and the Scottish Qualifications Authority.

Exam results in Scotland
Scottish Education Secretary Shirley-Anne Somerville (Jane Barlow/PA)

The national discussion, which is being co-convened by Cosla, will run until December. It is also being independently facilitated by Professor Carol Campbell and Professor Alma Harris who will report their findings to Scottish Government ministers and Cosla in Spring 2023.

Guides have been issued to schools to help facilitate the discussions and children can also email the Scottish Government or use the hashtag TalkScottishEducation.

Ahead of the discussion launch, during a visit to Carnegie Primary School in Dunfermline, Ms Somerville said: “It has been 20 years since Scotland last held a national debate on the future of education.

“Since then, the education landscape has changed beyond recognition, as has the world around us. It’s time for a new national discussion.

“Our reform programme will build on all that is good in Scottish education and deliver real change and improvement.

“Our children and young people hold the biggest stake in the education system so it is right that their views should be at the centre of those plans.

“We are inviting every child and young person to get involved. We want to hear all voices, particularly those who feel they haven’t been heard in the past.

“Resources have been developed to help prompt discussion around the country; within organisations, around kitchen tables and in our schools and youth settings.

“The vision which is created following the National Discussion will set out what education in Scotland needs to look like not only in the near future but 20 years from now – so let’s talk education.”