Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

New campaign on impact of hate crime aims to reach young people

The campaign was launched ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day (James Chapelard/Crimestoppers/PA)
The campaign was launched ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day (James Chapelard/Crimestoppers/PA)

A new campaign educating young people about the impact of hate crime and the importance of speaking up has been launched ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day.

Organised by Fearless.org, the youth service of the charity Crimestoppers, it features the voices of young people from across Scotland talking about their experiences of hate crime and prejudice-based bullying.

On the Fearless podcast, one young person who was the victim of a targeted assault because of his race and religion talks about how it affected his mental health.

Other young people explore living with a hidden disability, their sexuality, gender identity and the people who have supported them.

The initiative was launched to coincide with events around Holocaust Memorial Day on January 27.

Lyndsay McDade, Fearless national youth projects co-ordinator at Crimestoppers, said: “Holocaust Memorial Day isn’t just focused on commemorating the atrocities of the past.

“It very much encourages reflection on the prejudice, discrimination and hostility people face today – simply because of their identity.

“We know that the vast majority of young people are firmly anti-prejudice. Figures show that under-18s were responsible for just 6% of all recorded hate crime charges in Scotland last year.

“Therefore, this campaign aims to further explain to them the impact of hate crime and how they can challenge it, safely, amongst their peers, family and in their communities.

“If you are a victim of hate crime, I would strongly encourage you to tell a trusted adult, police or visit a Third Party Reporting Centre.

“If you have witnessed or are aware of who is responsible for hate crime, then you can speak up 100% anonymously to our charity at Fearless.org. We’re not able to trace your IP address or any contact details.”

As part of the initiative the charity will also be hosting a series of outreach events across the country.

The protected characteristics covered by hate crime legislation are disability, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation and transgender identity.

Equalities Minister Christina McKelvie MSP is supporting the campaign.

She said: “Education has a key role to play in building a society which actively challenges racism, eliminates discrimination and advances equality.

“On Holocaust Memorial Day and throughout the year, schools across Scotland are providing learning for children and young people that focus on the history and its impact on people and society today.

“The Scottish Government is committed to tackling all forms of discrimination and promoting a multi-faith and multi-cultural society based on mutual trust, respect and understanding.

“Projects such as Fearless educate young people on hate crime and prejudice. When young people are empowered to speak up, they are helping to make Scotland safer for everyone.”

– More information about the campaign can be found at https://crimestoppers-uk.org/fearless/professionals/fearless-scotland/hate-crime