Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Experts to assess Scotland’s preparedness for severe weather

Tens of thousands of homes were left without electricity in Scotland because of Storm Arwen last winter (SSEN/PA)
Tens of thousands of homes were left without electricity in Scotland because of Storm Arwen last winter (SSEN/PA)

Experts are set to monitor Scotland’s preparedness for severe weather following Storm Arwen last November, the Scottish Government has said.

The new Winter Preparedness Programme to test the response to and recovery from severe winter weather will run over the summer, led by the Scottish Resilience Partnership (SRP).

It is one of a number of measures developed to ensure Scotland is better prepared for significant weather events.

Tens of thousands of homes were left without electricity due to damage caused by Arwen, which brought 90mph winds to some areas.

Further storms – Malik and Corrie – followed in January and February this year, which exacerbated issues.

Scottish Politics Holyrood Covid 19 Scottish Parliament
Deputy First Minister John Swinney said Scotland needs to be prepared for severe weather (Fraser Bremner/Scottish Daily Mail/PA)

Deputy First Minister John Swinney said: “The purpose of the Storm Arwen review was to ensure lessons were learned and translated into real change to ensure Scotland’s collective resilience approach to future severe weather events is as robust as possible.

“The existing Scottish Government and partner arrangements at national, regional and local levels are underpinned by the same fundamental aim – to keep the people of Scotland safe from danger and ensure our communities are resilient and able to bounce back from challenging disruption.

“The Scottish Government and responder organisations have been working hard to begin implementing the review’s recommendations and I am reassured by the progress outlined today.

“However there is no room for complacency and we recognise the need to prepare for increased severe weather.

“Good planning and preparation is crucial to minimise the impacts on communities as experienced with Storm Arwen.”

Further measures introduced as a result of the Storm Arwen review will see an online and training hub established to help community groups and the voluntary sector prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies.

Fallen trees
Tens of thousands of trees were toppled or damaged during Storm Arwen last year (PA)

A new process to monitor and evaluate Scotland’s resilience system annually will also be developed to ensure issues are identified and resolved quickly.

Jim Savege, chair of the SRP, said: “Ensuring we have effective resilience across Scotland – whether at individual or household level, or for emergency responder organisations – requires a continual process of planning and preparation.

“Every incident and response is an opportunity for learning and improvement and this approach is at the heart of the annual SRP-led programme of preparedness.

“This year’s programme has included a strong focus on individual and community resilience which is of vital importance, particularly in light of Storm Arwen.

“I must extend my thanks to communities and organisations who have been working hard to ensure we are as ready and prepared as we can be to respond to and deal with the different events that are inevitably in front of us.”