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Alex Marshall makes history at Commonwealth Games

Lawn bowler Alex Marshall has become Scotland’s most successful Commonwealth Games athlete by winning a fifth gold medal in Australia.

He made history by leading his men’s fours team to victory over hosts Australia on the Gold Coast.

The 51-year-old from Tranent, East Lothian, competed alongside team-mates Ronald Duncan, Derek Oliver and Paul Foster.

Marshall was taking part in his sixth Commonwealth Games.

His medal haul includes two golds in Glasgow in 2014, and golds in 2006 in Melbourne and 2002 in Manchester. He won a silver medal in the men’s pairs earlier in this Games.

Speaking from the Gold Coast, Stewart Harris, sportscotland chief executive, said: “Congratulations to Alex, Paul, Ronnie and Derek on winning gold at the Commonwealth Games.

“It couldn’t have been a more dramatic conclusion with Scotland taking 4 in the final end to win, they did brilliantly to hold their nerve.

“A special mention for Alex who has become Scotland’s most successful Commonwealth Games athlete, winning his fifth gold medal, a tremendous achievement.

“It is fantastic that Team Scotland’s bowlers have managed to build on the great results at Glasgow 2014, and the performances in Gold Coast will help to continue that legacy of success in the sport.”

Scottish athletes have already celebrated securing the country’s best-ever medal haul at an oversees Commonwealth Games.

Their tally stands at 39, with the men’s fours team win taking the gold medal count to eight.

Team Scotland won a record 53 medals at Glasgow 2014 but the previous best performance at an away Games was at Melbourne in 2006 with 29 medals.