Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Alan Brazil: You’d be mad to be a manager these days

Leicester City's Leonardo Ulloa, Wes Morgan and Jamie Vardy celebrate after the final whistle during the UEFA Champions League, Round of 16, Second Leg match at the King Power Stadium, Leicester. (PA)
Leicester City's Leonardo Ulloa, Wes Morgan and Jamie Vardy celebrate after the final whistle during the UEFA Champions League, Round of 16, Second Leg match at the King Power Stadium, Leicester. (PA)

IMAGINE that every day since you were a child, everyone you knew had been telling you that you were brilliant.

Every single day, compliment after compliment.

Imagine that, as soon as you turned 16, you started earning 10 times what your old school friends earned.

Imagine the compliments kept coming. Imagine strangers started joining in.

Then throw in an enormous pay rise. Then another. Then another.

Pretty soon, you’d be believing the hype. You’d be thinking: “Yeah, I am pretty special.”

Ten years down the line, or less, you’d be a millionaire, a hero to tens of thousands every weekend, and you’d have your every whim catered for.

Fancy a new car? Don’t lift a finger – someone will deal with it for you.

Like the look of the new iPhone? Just fire off a text message.

Want a new house? Say the word.

That has been the way of things at the top level of football for years now.

But these days, player power is out of control – just ask Claudio Ranieri.

The turnaround at Leicester City since Ranieri was booted out of the door is unbelievable.

It leads to one conclusion. Too many players weren’t trying a yard for him.

Just like a new house, or a new car, they decided they wanted a new manager.

The response from the club was effectively: “Consider him sacked.”

I spoke to Leicester full-back Danny Simpson on my radio show through the week and, to be fair to him, he fronted up.

He knows the players were well below par under Ranieri. He admits they were unsettled and lacking in confidence.

That had an effect on their performances.

But the fact that they have been able to turn themselves around so quickly under Craig Shakespeare – waltzing into the Champions League quarter-finals in the process – suggests there was more going on.

My old Scotland team-mate, Graeme Souness, ripped into the City players after they brushed past Sevilla in midweek.

He accused them of taking their foot off the accelerator after winning the Premier League last season, then falling out with Ranieri when he pointed out their failings.

Graeme has a point.

I don’t believe every Leicester player was at war with their manager – but certain key players were.

In any dressing room, once the key players side against a manager, there are going to be big problems.

So it proved at the King Power – and I also believe at Derby County.

I’ve heard certain big players there weren’t enjoying working under Steve McClaren.

Again, as with Ranieri at Leicester, the manager paid the price.

For me, that’s a worrying trend.

I worry that top players will start to believe they have an easy way out if they start to find life difficult under a particular manager.

Never mind knuckling down, working to fix things, giving their all.

They simply have to sit back, take their foot off the gas, and wait for the inevitable.

If it can happen to the Premier League champions, it can happen anywhere.

Who’d be a manager? If you take that job on need your head examined.