Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

World leaders join forces to condemn US abortion ruling

© Jacquelyn Martin/AP/ShutterstockRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., joins abortion-rights activists as they demonstrate following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in Washington.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., joins abortion-rights activists as they demonstrate following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in Washington.

Nicola Sturgeon described the US Supreme Court’s decision to remove women’s right to abortion as “one of the darkest days for women’s rights in my lifetime” as states across America enforced bans yesterday.

After the judgement, the first minister posted: “Obviously the immediate consequences will be suffered by women in the US but this will embolden anti-abortion and anti-women forces in other countries too. Solidarity doesn’t feel enough right now – but it is necessary.”

Tomorrow, she will chair a summit in response to calls for buffer zones around Scottish clinics picketed by anti-abortion protesters.

Clinics in at least eight US states have halted performing abortions and others began to close hours after the Supreme Court removed American women’s constitutional right to the procedure.

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, South Dakota, Wisconsin and West Virginia stopped performing abortions after Friday’s decision.

The court’s overturning of the landmark Roe v Wade ruling is likely to lead to abortion bans in roughly half of the states. Of these, 13 outlawed abortion instantly.

The ruling was the culmination of decades of efforts by abortion opponents, made possible by an emboldened right side of the court fortified by three appointees of former president Donald Trump.

The decision prompted dismay around the world. Prime Minister Boris Johnson described it as a big step backwards, while French President Emmanuel Macron said: “Abortion is a fundamental right for all women. It must be protected.”

After the decision was announced protests built into the evening in a number of cities, including thousands demonstrating against the decision outside the barricaded Supreme Court. Thousands more chanted “We will rise up” in New York’s Washington Square.

Among the protesters in Washington DC was Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who shared her own story about a time she may have needed an abortion. She told how, when 22 or 23, she was raped.

She said: “I had to take a pregnancy test at a public bathroom in Midtown Manhattan and when I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was ‘thank God I have at least a choice’.”

At the White House, President Biden said: “It’s a sad day for the court and for the country.”

He urged voters to make it a defining issue in the November elections, declaring: “This decision must not be the final word.”