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Tycoon Jim McColl makes fresh offer over stricken Ferguson’s yard

© Ashley Coombes / EpicscotlandJim McColl
Jim McColl

The former owner of Ferguson’s shipyard has said he’d consider taking back joint control of the yard along with the Scottish Government.

Clyde Blowers tycoon Jim McColl was forced to hand the business to administrators five weeks ago. The Scottish Government has operated the yard with administrators since then. Mr McColl said he would consider running the Port Glasgow facility in a “joint arrangement” with Ministers.

A private buyer is being sought to take over the business which owes taxpayers around £50 million.

The yard ran into trouble after failing to complete a £97m order to build two ferries for Government-owned CalMac. Mr McColl has blamed design changes and bureaucracy for the spiralling costs of the order.

He added that, since the yard had been taken over by the Scottish Government, he had been part of a joint venture along with an overseas shipbuilder considering a bid to lift it out of administration. It is understood there are two other private bidders still interested.

Mr McColl said he would be “happy to talk to the Scottish Government about some sort of joint arrangement”.

He said this would involve the authorities setting up a separate company to complete the two CalMac ferries.

Mr McColl said this would allow the firm, which is part of the winning tender for work on the £1.25 billion Royal Navy Type 31 frigates, to focus on work that could be lost.