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Trump attacks judge as travel ban is overturned

Thousands of protesters with placards take part in a demonstration against U.S. President Donald Trump (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
Thousands of protesters with placards take part in a demonstration against U.S. President Donald Trump (Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

DONALD Trump’s ban on travellers from seven mainly Muslim countries entering the United States has been overturned.

Federal Judge James Robart has ruled there were grounds to challenge the temporary ban on around 60,000 foreigners which has led to worldwide condemnation.

Last night the US State Department moved to revoke the ban in the wake of the court ruling and said people covered by the order and holding a valid visa may now travel to the US.

However, Mr Trump has vowed to overturn the legal ruling, describing Mr Robart – who was appointed to the top job by Republican president George W. Bush in 2003 – as a “so-called” judge.

Trump’s administration argues that his executive order issued last week, which caused confusion and anger at airports across the country, is designed to protect the US.

The US President took to Twitter to explain.

He said: “The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!

“When a country is no longer able to say who can, and who cannot, come in & out, especially for reasons of safety & security – big trouble!”

Judge Robart ruled in Seattle against government lawyers’ claims that Washington state and Minnesota, which sued over the ban, lacked the legal grounds to challenge Mr Trump’s order.

Judge Robart said the states showed that their case was likely to succeed.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said the Justice Department would appeal the “outrageous” order at the earliest possible time.

Mr Spicer quickly issued an amended statement that deleted the word “outrageous”.

“The president’s order is intended to protect the homeland and he has the constitutional authority and responsibility to protect the American people,” Mr Spicer said, calling the order both lawful and appropriate.

Among those who will benefit from the change is an Iranian baby banned from entering the US for life-saving heart surgery.

The family had an appointment in Dubai to get a tourist visa but it was abruptly cancelled last week after Mr Trump announced his executive order on immigration banning travel to the United States by people from seven predominantly Muslim countries, including Iran.

Four-month-old Fatemeh Reshad was forced to return home.

Mr Trump’s order had imposed an indefinite ban on Syrian refugees. Anyone arriving from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan or Yemen faces a 90-day visa suspension.

A petition calling on the UK Government to prevent Mr Trump from making a state visit to Britain because it would cause “embarrassment” to the Queen has received more than 1.8 million signatures.

Downing Street rejected claims the Queen has been put in a difficult position due to the invitation and insisted the state visit would go ahead this year but MPs will debate the matter later this month.

Yesterday, thousands of protesters marched through the streets of London to call on Theresa May to end her “collusion” with Mr Trump.