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Police contact Russian exiles in Britain to discuss their safety as 14 deaths are reviewed

Russian asylum seeker Alexander Shopovalov (Copyline)
Russian asylum seeker Alexander Shopovalov (Copyline)

RUSSIAN exiles in the UK have been contacted by police to discuss their safety.

Sources claimed the Metropolitan Police have spoken to number of Russians across the country amid the growing tensions between the Westminster and the Kremlin. One said: “Police and security services have reassessed their view that other exiles [from Russia] are a low risk”.

The deaths of 14 men with Russian connections in Britain previously thought to be non-suspicious are already being reviewed after the nerve agent attack in Salisbury.

The Met refused to comment or identify any of the Russians contacted.

Exiles who claim their life is at risk include Alexander Shapovalov who has taken refuge in the Highlands and is fighting extradition from the UK.

The 58-year-old businessman claims Vladimir Putin wants him dead.

It’s your move, Prime Minister: Kremlin expels 23 diplomats in wake of nerve agent attack

Meanwhile, MI5 and the Met are re-examining the deaths of 14 people on British soil with potential links to Russia.

Those deaths thought to be part of the probe include Dundee millionaire Scot Young, who was found dead outside his London home in December 2014, and Matthew Puncher, a British scientist who played a key role in investigating the poisoning of Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko.

Oligarch Boris Berezovsky and his business partner Badri Patarkatsishvili are also among those who have died with possible Russian links.