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Harry Potter books now really are a braw read thanks to Scots translation

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FAMOUSLY written in Edinburgh cafés by JK Rowling, Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone became a publishing phenomenon when it was released and sparked a series of books and films.

This past summer marked the 20th anniversary of the book’s publication.

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Unsurprisingly, such is its popularity, in those intervening years the novel has been translated into several different languages.

Last Thursday saw it translated for the 80th time, but this language is much closer to home – because on this occasion Harry Potter was translated into Scots.

Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stane is the latest famous book to receive the treatment of Itchy Coo, an imprint based in Edinburgh which for the past 15 years has converted classic texts into Scots.

A Word on the Words: My somewhat strained relationship with Scots

Previous works include Roald Dahl’s’ The Eejits and Chairlie And The Chocolate Factory and David Walliams’ Mr Mingin and Billionaire Bairn.

It was co-founded by Matthew Fitt and James Robertson and aims to promote, understand and accept the Scots language in education and all aspects of Scottish life.

The Itchy Coo team has made nearly 1000 visits to schools and libraries, as well as releasing nearly 40 books in Scots.

This new version of Harry sounds like an awfy magic read!