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TV review: Alps murders revisited… How did killer slip the net?

© Ryan McnamaraAlps murders detective Mark Preston, victim’s brother Zaid Al-Hilli, and author Tom Parry
Alps murders detective Mark Preston, victim’s brother Zaid Al-Hilli, and author Tom Parry

I am always intrigued by a true crime drama, so when I heard about Murder In The Alps, I knew I had to watch.

The first of the three-part documentary tells the story. On September 5, 2012, three members of a British family were found dead in their car in the French Alps.

Nearby a seven-year-old girl had been shot and left for dead, and a French cyclist had also been shot.

The question of how they were killed would lead to a 10-year investigation and, even a decade on, the mystery is still unsolved.

Channel 4’s documentary looks at the theories and facts behind the crime. Speaking to the last people to see the family, from Surrey, alive as well as police officer Mark Preston who led the British murder investigation, the show tries to make sense of the bizarre case which saw Saad al-Hilli, wife Iqbal and mother-in-law Souhaila al-Allaf killed and the couple’s daughters – seven year-old Zainab and Zeena, aged four – orphaned.

The truth about the attack is unknown – only that it was a lone gunman on a motorcycle.

It’s a huge – still open – case that has baffled the experts for almost a decade.

Can this show uncover something that hasn’t been spotted before? Or encourage someone with information to come forward? I can only hope so for the sake of these poor girls.


Murder In The Alps, Channel 4