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Lights, camera, Gaelic as pupils learn language to make a movie

The children made the film using mobile phone cameras (Andrew Cawley)
The children made the film using mobile phone cameras (Andrew Cawley)

WHEN a group of pupils at Ochil House in Stirling decided to make a documentary, they knew exactly what they wanted to say.

“Chan eil sinn ciormach idir. ‘S e clann gun samhail, laghach, cunntasach, spòrsail, a th’ annainn.”

That’s “We aren’t disabled. We’re unique, kind, responsible, fun kids,” to those who can’t speak Gaelic.

The six learned Gaelic for the making of the film, which they also directed, edited and soundtracked.

Proving their statement true, the documentary, Failte gu Ochil House, has been nominated for a prize at a Gaelic short film awards ceremony in Glasgow on Friday. Ochil House is a specialist provision attached to Wallace High School for children with complex health and learning needs.

Some of them will attend the FilmG Awards at The Old Fruitmarket, as will their proud Gaelic teacher, Alison MacRae.

“The group only started learning Gaelic in August and I thought, why not learn it for a reason?” she said. “They came up with the concept, the script, then did the voiceovers.

“They were keen to put out the message that they are capable – one of the lines is ‘We are not disabled, we are able’.

“Being nominated is such a confidence boost – not just in their Gaelic studies, but to be competing on a level playing field.”

The six pupils, who are aged between 13 and 17, are brothers Isaac and Lukas, Liam, Timmy, James and Taylor.

Liam said: “I have a speech prepared, just in case, where I’ll thank them for choosing us.”