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Golf In Scotland In The Black & White Era – 5 Things to expect

© SuppliedGolf in Scotland in the Black and White era
Packed with archive photos, Golf in Scotland in the Black and White era is great walk down memory lane.

As we approach the historic 150th Open, step back in time with our latest title, Golf in Scotland in the Black & White era.

Featuring greats of the game, iconic courses and photos showing the way golf has evolved through the decades, here are 5 things readers can expect.

1. Rediscovered archive photos

John Panton © Supplied by DC Thomson
John Panton, one of the greats of Scottish golf, seen here (left) age 19 in 1935, after beating W.A McKenzie in the Pitlochry Championship.

Author Steve Finan has spent years exploring the vast DC Thomson archive, examining negatives tucked away waiting to be discovered.

A collection of ‘new’ old photographs, this latest title includes snaps that have lain unseen for 40, 50 and 60 years or more.

Joan Lawrence © Supplied by DC Thomson
Joan Lawrence during the Scottish Amateur at Troon, 1957, having just given her ball a “good skite” (as we say in Scotland). Joan would go on to win three Scottish titles in a row.

Taken in the 35mm era or in the older days of gelatin plate dry negatives, enjoy work from photographers stepping onto the course whilst doing their best to refrain from disturbing the play!

2. Revisiting giants of the sport

Gary Player, 1968 Open Champion at Carnoustie. © Supplied by DC Thomson
Gary Player, 1968 Open Champion at Carnoustie.

Enjoy a huge selection of photos revisiting players and stories etched into the history of golf in Scotland.

Featuring pre-war and post-war figures as well as heroes of the women’s game, see some of the greatest golfers in history stepping onto courses around Scotland.

Jack Nicklaus (centre) pictured during practice day at Troon searching for his ball in the long rough, 1973. © Supplied by DC Thomson
Jack Nicklaus (centre) pictured during practice day at Troon searching for his ball in the long rough, 1973.

Bobby Jones, the ‘Big Three’ Nicklaus, Palmer and Gary Player, Babe Zaharia, Bobby Locke, Peter Thomson, and Seve Ballesteros are just a handful of names making an appearance.

Woven through each chapter, Steve references some of golf’s most discussed moments.

From Nicklaus’ third Open win in front of a record-breaking crowd at St Andrews in 1978 to the first Open held at Carnoustie in 1931 and on to Bobby Jones, one of the golf’s most influential figures, readers are taken on a memorable nostalgia trip.

Frank Sinatra © Supplied by DC Thomson
Among those attending the 1953 Open at Carnoustie was a certain Mr F. Sinatra, pictured here in the tented village. The great crooner also took the opportunity to arrange a concert at Dundee’s Caird Hall.

A handful of famous faces also make a cameo appearances, including Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, Frank Sinatra.

3. Legendary Courses

The 7th and 11th green at St Andrews (1947). © Supplied by DC Thomson
The 7th and 11th green at St Andrews (1947). Finding yourself in the position this golfer is in can be very tough – as many a great name has found out. Go long on the 11th and you are in deep trouble.

Explore St Andrews, the spiritual home of golf, revisit Carnoustie and see the stars of days gone by at Troon, Muirfield, and more.

From centuries-old Swilcan Bridge and the notorious ‘Hell’ 14th bunker at St Andrews to the Barry Burn at Carnoustie, this book has photos of legendary courses and their sometimes treasured, sometimes feared, features.

Fans will enjoy a series of photos showing off St Andrews, the home of golf.

Steve dedicates an entire chapter to the world’s oldest and best-known golf venue.

Taking to the skies above the iconic Fife town, Steve has also unearthed some fabulous aerial shots of St Andrews and local landmarks.

4. See the changing face of the game

A crowd watching Arnold Palmer at Muirfield, 1966. © Supplied by DC Thomson
A crowd watching Arnold Palmer at Muirfield, 1966.

Evolving from nostalgic amateur days to the global phenomenon we know today, Golf in Scotland in the Black & White era highlights how the face of the game has changed.

Looking at the way tournaments are held, grounds maintained, scores were kept, the rise of television and more; carefully chosen photos piece together decades of change (some for the better, some for the worse) resulting in the modern game.

5. Hear from a former European Tour No. 1

Monty and Lee Trevino on St Andrews’ 18th green during the 1990 Open. © Supplied by DC Thomson
Monty and Lee Trevino on St Andrews’ 18th green during the 1990 Open.

Former Ryder Cup Captain and European Tour No. 1, Colin Montgomrie provides a nostalgic foreword.

Colin shares his enthusiasm for Scottish golf history and his own read-through experience seeing how courses he knows well have evolved through the years.

Monty’s foreword is a fitting start to a wonderful slice of golf nostalgia!

Explore Golf in Scotland in the Black & White era

Explore Golf in Scotland in the Black & White era

The result of years of research trawling through old photos and negatives, order Golf in Scotland in the Black and White era, today.