Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Crowds gather at US embassy in March For Our Lives protest over gun control

Protesters during the March For Our Lives anti-gun rally outside the US Embassy in London (Stefan Rousseau/PA)
Protesters during the March For Our Lives anti-gun rally outside the US Embassy in London (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

HUNDREDS of protesters have gathered outside the US embassy in London to demand an end to mass shootings, pledging to “stay angry” until gun laws are reformed.

It comes as tens of thousands are set to march on the White House on Saturday in a rally organised by survivors of the Parkland school shooting in Florida.

Student Courtney Chatterton, 21, told the Press Association about a false alarm at her university near Chicago, Illinois, on March 14, the day before she flew to visit a friend in the UK.

 

Dunblane families join US gun control protests

She said: “We got all these emergency messages saying there was a shooter on campus. It was utterly terrifying, I started shaking immediately.

“People were barricading themselves in classrooms.”

The March For Our Lives movement is urging Congress to ban assault-style, high-capacity rifles which have been used with deadly efficiency in recent mass shootings.

They also want “background check loopholes” closed that allow dangerous people to “slip through the cracks and buy guns online or at gun shows”.

Protesters chanted “Not one more” and “books not bullets” before they staged a three-minute silent “die-in” in remembrance of shooting victims.

Organiser Stephen Paduano urged the crowd to “stay angry” at Congress over its “dereliction of duty”.

Julia Langfitt, from Maryland, who moved to Surrey with her family two years ago, told the Press Association: “It’s time. It’s ridiculous how many children are killed every week and still nothing is done about it.”

Her daughter Kathrine, 16, added: “My childhood friends go to class knowing they could be killed. No-one should ever be that scared at school.

“They had a lockdown the other week – they happen all the time. They’re terrified that this is the new normal.”

Around 800 protests are happening worldwide on Saturday, sparked after a former pupil wielding a AR-15 rifle gunned down his ex-classmates at Stoneman Douglas High School.

He massacred 17 students and teachers in the Valentine’s Day spree.

The marches follow synchronised national school “walk-outs” across the US earlier this month, when thousands of pupils left class for 17 minutes – one minute for each victim.