Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Concerns over Police Scotland’s complaints procedures to be raised in Holyrood

In Sunday's paper we reported on an alleged culture of bullying and sexism in an elite firearms unit
In Sunday's paper we reported on an alleged culture of bullying and sexism in an elite firearms unit

The Scottish Conservatives will raise the governance of Police Scotland at Holyrood after The Sunday Post revealed officers’ concerns around an elite firearms unit.

The party’s justice spokesman Liam Kerr will question SNP justice secretary Humza Yousaf about Police Scotland’s complaints procedures on Wednesday.

The questions come after our reports revealed a former member of the firearms unit covering the east of Scotland sent a report to senior officers in the national force suggesting the squad was demoralised, exhausted and riven by sexism, bullying and a gung-ho attitude to firearm protocols.

Whistleblower alleges toxic culture of bullying and sexism within force has left Scotland’s armed police officers exhausted and demoralised

Our story came days after former lord advocate, Dame Elish Angiolini, in a report commissioned by ministers, urged the Scottish Government to overhaul how complaints against Police Scotland are investigated and warned the national force must address issues around sexism and racism.

Scottish Conservative leader Douglas Ross said: “From reading Dame Elish’s report and speaking to police officers across Scotland, it is evident the government’s police complaints and governance system is broken.

“The result has been that far too many officers, police staff and members of the public have been badly let down since the creation of Police Scotland and the apparatus that is supposed to hold it to account.

“In many cases, people have suffered injustice resulting in significant impact on their health and wellbeing, destroyed careers and financial loss.

“The relationship between the public and the police is built on trust and that simply cannot be jeopardised because the nationalist government in Edinburgh ignores the day job because of its relentless obsession with breaking up the UK.

“At its most basic, this is about fairness, transparency and natural justice. That is why we are determined that the government won’t get away with sticking Dame Elish’s report into a drawer and forgetting about it.”